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Latin phrase: Luctor et Emergo

by Ethan
(Pennsylvania, U.S.)

Dear Latin Teacher,


I recently found a Latin phrase that I would really like to get in a tattoo but I want to authenticate it first with someone who knows Latin. I won't say what the English translation I think it is but if you could say a rough translation, if there is one of the phrase "luctor et emergo"

Thanks, Ethan


Dear Ethan,

It means "I struggle and emerge". Here's a link to a previous post about this Latin phrase.

Hope this helps, and thanks for asking a Latin teacher.

Sincerely,

John

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Luctor et emergo: Would it be the same for a girl?
by: Anonymous

Would the phrase "luctor et emergo" remain the same for a girl?


Dear Anonymous,

Yes, the verbs are first person singular, meaning the subject is I. So it stays the same for masculine and feminine.

Sincerely,

John


Luctor et Emergo in the Past Tense?
by: Anonymous

Can this phrase be written in the past tense in latin? i.e., I challenged and I emerged?


Dear Anonymous,

Certainly: luctatus sum et emersi.

For the perfect tense, however, the verb to struggle would be different for a feminine subject: luctata sum et emersi.

Thanks for contributing,

Sincerely,

John

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Luctor et Emergo Victrix
by: Anonymous

Is the following correct?

luctor et emergo victrix = I struggle and emerge the victor.


Yes, this is correct, so long as you are a woman. For a man, use victor.

Sincerely,

John


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